Miss Jaiya
“Marriage was a relationship of a dominant male to a subordinate female,” she told them. “That ended as a result of this court’s decision in 1982 when Louisiana’s Head and Master Rule was struck down…”, RBG’s argument on Obergefell v. Hodges, 2015

This is not a political argument. It’s a humanitarian one.

Our sexual freedom as we know it today is, in large part, thanks to the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

We thank you, Justice Ginsburg, for your support in helping the marginalized and the oppressed be heard and seen…and for supporting our rights to experience otherworldly orgasms with whomever we choose!

Sexual freedom is a birthright and Justice Ginsburg recognized that. She knew that it was not the place of the government, employers or anyone else to tell us who we can and can’t experience love and intimacy with.

She fought for people of all races, sexes, and sexual orientation to be able to live lives in full expression of who we are without that interference.

She was the voice of the downtrodden. A powerful voice advocating to have our country live up to the aspirations set forth in our Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution.

Because of her work, the powers that be cannot dictate (as of the writing of this piece) who we can and can’t spend our lives with or how we experience love and sex.

Expansion. Growth. Full self and sexual expression.

That’s what the great Ruth Bader Ginsburg stood for for many people.

Because of her efforts, we were on a trajectory to full acceptance of every human’s right to live, love, be protected from discrimination in the workplace and happily exist in a world where many are so horribly repressed.

Centuries of patriarchal oppression was slowly being unraveled.

But it all hangs in the balance now.

Your Rights are likely under threat.

No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; … nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” ~The 14th Amendment

If a Supreme Court Justice replacement who is not in favor of comprehensive human rights is put in her place, everything that she and thousands of others have spent their lives working for…and the people of the LGBTQ and BIPOC communities who still need her voice in their corner…could crumble.

RBG stood for equality for all.

And by establishing that the 14th Amendment, which was established to give newly-freed, enslaved people the right to equal protection under the Constitution, could be used to fight for equal protection for everyone, the LGBTQ+ community was able to claim protection under that same Amendment.

So, it was her strategy in the 1970’s, in addition to her own later decisions as SCOTUS, decades later, that helped lead the LGBTQ+ and BIPOC communities to have access to the rights we experience today.

She’s no longer a voice for the people.

Do not let her voice be silenced. Use your voice to fill the void left by RBG’s death.

Whether or not you are a member of the LGBTQ+ or BIPOC communities, this shift in the high court will affect you.

What Can You Do to Maintain Your Right to Sexual Freedom?

Vote.

Speak up about what’s going on.

Stand up for those you see who are in need.

Give voice to the voiceless, just as RBG did.

Continue to use love and compassion as the sword of justice.

Use your privilege to help those without and we are all privileged in some way that others are not.

The long march to true freedom for all is far from over.

We are now facing some of the biggest challenges to the strides that have been made in the U.S..

Now is the time to redouble our efforts and live up to the call to create…

“Liberty and Justice for All!

”May the tireless work and courage of the great humanitarian Supreme Court Justice, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, be our guiding light in these dark times!

With love and light,

Ian, Jaiya and Team Pleasure